All Change

Uni Updates

In the past few weeks I’ve had to change my class timetable several times, so the post I previously wrote about classes is now pretty much null and void. One of the changes I had expected; Creative Writing Dissertation is for 4th years or 3rd years doing a general humanities degree. Since I am neither it means that I don’t need to take it this year. The good news is that I don’t need to resubmit a portfolio next year; I just need to email to say I’m still interested. While I was looking forward to it, I have to admit I am a little glad of the delay. The last year has been very difficult and while I’ve been planning my novel out in my head, I’ve not actually touched it for months. So a year of getting involved with it again will really help 🙂

The other change is that I am no longer taking comparative literature courses. I received a very unprofessional and condescending email from one of the senior lecturers. There was a specific bit where my disabilities were mentioned and that is all I am saying. I felt extremely uncomfortable after this and have therefore chosen not to take the courses. I’m disappointed because I was looking forward to them, but the bad outweighed the good. It has actually worked out in my favour because it meant I was taking an extra course due to the weird 20 credits for comparative literature modules, where as english literature ones are 30 credits. That means two courses per semester, where as with the comparative literature I was doing 3-4 – the comparative literature ones lasted 2 semesters. Each english lit course is just one semester. It likewise has given me a much nicer timetable; I’m off both wednesday and thursday, with one 10am lecture on fridays.

So what am I actually taking now? I’m still taking Victorian Literature. This term it is accompanied by Medieval English Literature:

On this course Honours students will have the opportunity to explore texts from the period of Chaucer’s lifetime, when English literature exploded into life. The texts selected will be contextualised within the fourteenth-century cultures and societies within which they were produced and received. Themes and theories covered will be based on topics such as authorship, patronage, sexuality, gender, piety, personal identity, historicism, legend, medievalism, audience, manuscript production. At the end of the course, assessment will give students the opportunity to demonstrate their ability (1) to translate and comment on select passages of late medieval literary texts; (2) to discuss and locate select texts within the culture, society and linguistic and literary milieux in which they were produced; (3) to discuss the approaches and techniques available to and used by critics and commentators in the interpretation of these texts.

 

For those of you who don’t know; I did my history of art dissertation on manuscripts. Apocalyptic manuscripts to be precise. I also really enjoyed a manuscript based course I did in third year, so this is essentially looking at manuscripts from the opposite side; literature rather than art. I also took a previous medieval studies course during the same degree, so I figured this would be building up on knowledge I already have.

In term 2 I still have Humanities in the classroom, and now also Modern Literature 1945 to Present.

This course offers an opportunity to study the key writers, genres and movements of the immediate post-WWII period through to the contemporary moment. Through an extremely varied programme of lectures and seminars, students are introduced to a range of literary texts (poetry, drama, novels and graphic novels), placed in relevant historical and cultural contexts and critical debates. Students will be encouraged to read widely in order to understand the diversity and innovation that characterizes contemporary writing. Lectures will address the impact of a range of important cultural and political concerns (e.g. war, racial and ethnic diversity, national identities, changing attitudes to sex and sexuality, ecological crisis) as well as changes (and continuities) in the forms and genres through which writers have engaged with these issues.

I like my literature the opposite way to my art; I prefer modern literature, especially this time period. Plus getting to study Angela Carter, Neil Gaimen and graphic novels is just awesome.

The class changes are not the only changes. For the past month and a bit I have been working at my university as a part of the enrolment and registration support team. And as of today, that job is officially over 🙁 I really enjoyed the job and met some amazing people who I intend to stay in contact with. It just feels so weird now that it is over!

I also had my assessment with the private physio and wow, just wow. I don’t remember ever not feeling some sort of pain or discomfort, and she did some nerve work on my arm/shoulder/neck where there is pressure on the nerve. I felt pain free for a while and it was blissful. She was lovely, so understanding and not at all judgemental. So I’m just starting a new period in my life; she’s the first person in 8 years to actually help me battle against my hypermobility syndrome. I have my first proper appointment on monday, and I just hope I can go. All that time around freshers has inevitably given me Freshers Flu. I’m due a new flu vaccine and it only covers the most popular forms of flu, so this one has managed to slip in under the radar and I feel terrible.

 

I have classes!

Postgrad

It’s been a small nightmare getting my classes sorted out for this year. Due to the resit I had to wait for someone to progress me onto the next year, and this was delayed by some major problems with the entire system. Those were finally sorted at the beginning of the week and mine wasn’t. It took all week, but finally Friday I got my classes sorted. So now it’s time for the annual pre-term what is Heather studying this year blog post.

I actually have no idea whether some of these courses are for both semesters, or if I need to pick a semester to study them in. Likewise with the two core English Literature lectures I’ve no idea whether I need to take both or one per semester. As for whether there are tutorials and assessments for them (just confirmed that they are not assessed) – your guess is as good as mine. So there will probably be another update in a few weeks before classes start.

Let’s start off with the two core lectures – basically the ones the department force you to take:

 

ENGLIT 4060 – LC01   Introducing Forms and Genres
To introduce students entering the Honours English Literature Programme to the key literary genres and forms that they will encounter in a range of course options within the programme: to present and analyse examples of a variety of literary forms and demonstrate how they have evolved within literary history; to introduce students to the critical debates that relate to the study of  literary form and genre.
ENGLIT 4061 – Introduducing Concepts and Approaches
To introduce students entering the Honours English Literature Programme to a set of key literary concepts and critical approaches to literature that they will encounter in a range of course options within the programme: to present and analyse examples of a variety of concepts and demonstrate how they have evolved within literary history; to introduce students to the critical debates that relate to the study of  literature.
Everything else was up to me and I chose:
ENGLIT 4014 – Literature 1780-1840 (aka Victorian Literature)
This course addresses prose, poetry and drama from the Nineteenth Century.  Students can expect to study the work of major novelists, such as George Eliot, as well as poetry by figures such as Lord Alfred Tennyson, Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Rudyard Kipling.  Students will be encouraged to place their understanding of such literary writings in context with some of the major social, historical and political developments in this period;  they will also be encouraged to draw upon the work of authors across the period, from the early novels of Charles Dickens in the 1840 to fin de siècle writings by Oscar Wilde and Robert Louis Stevenson from the 1890’s.
Creative Writing Dissertation
Creative writing, taught through workshops, is a valuable discipline in developing editorial, critical and creative skills. Students facing the demands of genre and the challenges of form become differently aware of the dynamics involved and of the values inherent in different kinds and combinations of creative work. They grow alert to issues of diction, syntax, tone, rhythm, structure and progression in their own and in their fellow students¹ writing, and this experience feeds into their reading and criticism. In seeing how form has been and can be honoured, subverted, developed and disrupted, they come to discriminate between authentic and factitious experiment, and to understand by imitation and example.

This dissertation course gives students an opportunity to build up their own work within a strict critical workshop context, and to become part of that context in appraising and encouraging the work of fellow writers. Each student, in relation to the writing of others, develops editorial and critical skills, while learning to work to length and to deadline. More than an exploration of self, the course is an exploration of the art of writing and an exploration of its techniques.

COMPLIT 4017 – LC01   The Brothers Grimm and the European Fairy Tale
This course will examine some of the tales written down by the Grimms and others, and students will discuss various interpretations to which they have been subjected. By focusing on various interpretations of tales (for example, psychological, literary, folkloristic, formalistic, feminist, Marxist) students will begin to see how this simplest form of narrative can carry so much importance for informing just how it is that we humans make meaning through telling stories.
COMPLIT 4016 – SM01   Infidelities
This course explores treatments of the theme of adultery and infidelity in some depth and across a wide range of texts and genres. Taking as its starting point representations of adultery in European narrative, the course will encourage students to analyse parallels and contrasts between the texts on thematic and stylistic levels and in relation to socio-cultural contexts, but will also require them to go beyond a mere thematic
reading to consider questions of gender, class, identity.
ENGLIT 4052 – LC01   Humanities in the Classroom (with work placement)
This course examines the effects of educational policy and methods on discipline formation in Scotland and Britain, from 1850 to the present.  It encourages all students to reflect critically on their own attributes, skills and experiences in learning and teaching, and gives those with an interest in a career in education an opportunity to become more familiar with aspects of professional life.  Working in groups as well as individually, students consider their disciplines from the outside, learning to explain key elements of them to a variety of non-specialists.  The course will include institutional visits to educational institutions.  It gives students an opportunity to apply and adapt their disciplinary knowledge to problems demanding multidisciplinary approaches.  The course’s emphasis on enquiry-based learning and assessment methods aims to improve students’ confidence, teamwork skills and presentation skills.
This version of the course includes a voluntary work placement in an educational institution or other location where education is provided.