Review: CareCo Exercise Band

RewviI was diagnosed with hypermobility at the age of 14 after multiple ankle injuries which culminated in the tearing of all the ligaments in one ankle. Not pretty right? So when the opportunity came around to review some products from CareCo the discount mobility experts I grabbed the chance to review their exercise band. Exercise bands like this were a core part of the many years of intense physio I had that focused on stabilising my ankles. Although I used them primarily for working with my ankles back then,  exercise bands have a variety of uses for such a simple and inexpensive product.

 

Careco Exercise Band in Pouch

First Impressions

I was really impressed with the neat little pouch that the band came in. It’s exactly as advertised on the site, however, anyone who’s ever done physio will know that you don’t get handed one so neatly packaged. In the past if I’ve been given one by a physiotherapist they have quite literally gone to a massive role that they have and cut a length off of it. So just having that little bit of extra effort made in the presentation and also having somewhere to put the band between exercises makes a big difference to me.

CareCo 4 Week exercise resistance plan booklet

 

The band also comes with a 4 week resistance exercise plan booklet which is fantastic! The contents include the four weeks plan as well as exercise tips, dieting tips, mental fitness and further advice. I really appreciate that Careco have included mental fitness in the booklet and it has some great – and more importantly useful – advice in that respect. The diet page is brief and useful, not at all lecturing or guilt tripping.

 

CareCo Exercise Resistance Plan Week One

 

In regards to the exercises each week tackles a separate area of the body; week one is upper body, week two is legs, week three is abdominal (chest and back) and week four is legs and triceps. You have the option of doing the plan as it is set out or using the booklet as a guide for what area of your body you need to focus on. For someone with a condition like mine, hypermobility/hypermobile EDS, it could be wrists one day and legs the next so I can quite easily flip through the guide and select an exercise that pertains for that area of the body. And there are several options to choose from as well.

 

Careco Exercise Band for Resistance Exercises

Exercise Band

The band itself is pretty much a standard exercise band made of the same stretchy rubber material as all the bands I have previously encountered. Exercise bands can come in different strengths depending on the needs of the patient, and the CareCo band does not seem to come with any strength details. The specification segment of the product page is empty so no luck there. When testing the strength for myself I found that it had quite a high resistance strength so this may not be the best product for someone with weak joints or muscles.

 

Numbers on the CareCo Exercise Band for hand positions

What I did like about the exercise band is that it is numbered; each number pertains hand places for the exercises outlined in the guide book. This is a really useful feature that helps the users become accustomed to using the band and grow comfortable and confident in doing so. It also ensures that they use the band correctly reducing the risk of injuring by over stretching their muscles.

 

The CareCo exercise band fits easily back into the pouch with plenty of room to spare!

 

One last thing I wanted to check was whether the handy pouch was actually as useful as it seemed – and yes it is! Sometimes when you get an accompanying bag for an item, especially one that can be messy to put back in like a rubber exercise band, the bag isn’t as up to the job as it first appears. But as you can see I had absolutely no problem popping it back into the pouch. The band folded up easily and there was plenty of room left in the pouch for a time if I wasn’t able to fold it neatly (which is an issue if my fingers are sore) and I needed to just jam it in.

 

Resistance Strength Rating of the CareCo Exercise Band

Conclusion

Overall it’s a good product for £11.99 (inc. VAT) and CareCo have put a lot of time and effort into the supporting material to ensure that users have the information they need to get started straight away. This makes the product a great all rounder for a variety of customers; whether you’re just starting out with fitness, have been recommended resistance exercises by a physiotherapist or you’re a fitness fanatic this exercise band has something for everyone.

My only reservation about the product is that it does not come with a resistance strength rating and I do feel that this is an oversight by CareCo. I gave it a few strong tugs to test the resistance for the purpose of this review, and the day after my wrist was still tender. It would be remiss of me not to mention that this band might be too strong for, or at least requires careful use for those with weak joints/muscles and who run the risk of hyper-extension or dislocation. It can still be used provided you are aware of the strength and take that into consideration when using this product for exercises.

 

Over to You

I hope you enjoyed this review and found it useful! Don’t forget to check out CareCo’s website they have a great range of mobility products at good prices compared to other places. They also offer a price comparison service so if you find it cheaper else where they will match it!

Have you used an exercise band before?

Are you familiar with CareCo?

What are some of your favourite mobility or health aids?

Let me know in the comments! If you have any questions about this product please do not hesitate to ask 🙂

5 Replies to “Review: CareCo Exercise Band”

  1. I have really weak ankles – mainly because I’m super clumsy and end up tripping up over my own feet and spraining something every other month – so this looks perfect for strengthening them up a little. I was going to look into going to physio, but if there’s something I can do at home where I don’t need to interact with strangers, then I am all for that haha.

    Emma | https://geekytourist.com

    1. That is exactly how I found out I had hypermobility so I would look into that as well as trying something like this 🙂 You can check for hypermobilty by trying the Beighton score test (http://hypermobility.org/help-advice/hypermobility-syndromes/beighton-score/ ) and if you think that you’re able to do some of these things I would consider speaking to your doctor about it. They will then refer you to a specialist who can investigate it further. I know that sounds scary, but it’s much better to know about it and be aware of it 🙂 Your story is so similar to mine that I wouldn’t feel right not offering this advice; being clumsy is very common in hypermobile people too! I walk into walks on an hourly basis 😉 I’m always available to talk if you want to know more.

      I also spent pretty much my entire teenage years wearing sports ankle supports like these – https://www.boots.com/boots-advanced-adjustable-ankle-support-10172870 – which help support your ankle from every day wear and tear, preventing you from sprains and other injuries. Wearing those plus using exercises bands like this and having regular physio was the key to stabilising my ankles.

    2. Oh my god, I can do all of these. I thought it was just that I was double jointed! I’m going to have to look into this a little more.. Thanks for the heads up!

    3. Double jointed tends to mean you’re hypermobile 🙂 I can do everything on the scale too which means I have a very high score. Please go see your doctor because I thought it was just my ankles and there turned out to be a lot more to it. Thankfully it’s 2018 now so you’ll get a much more accurate assessment; it was (gets a calculator :P) 1999/2000 when I was first getting treatment so they only really noticed it in my ankles. No one knew back then to look else where.

      As I said, I am here to talk and answer any questions you have. The HMSA website is a fantastic resource and they have things you can take along to your doctor, as well as helping you talk to your doctor about hypermobility. The great thing is that they just worked with the NHS to produce information for GPS on how to recognise and treat hypermobility too 🙂

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